Enlightenment and Inner Division

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This wisdom from Adyashanti gave me pause for thought today.

Adyashanti on Enlightenment and Inner Division

“Most human beings spend their lives battling with opposing inner forces: what they think they should do versus what they are doing; how they feel about themselves versus how they are; whether they think they’re right and worthy or wrong and unworthy.
The separate self is just the conglomeration of these opposing forces. When the self drops away, inner division drops away with it.

Now, I can’t say that I never make a mistake, because in this human world being enlightened doesn’t mean we become experts at everything. What does happen, though, is that personal motivations disappear.
Only when enlightenment occurs do we realize that virtually everything we did, from getting out of bed to going to work to being in a relationship to pursuing our pleasures and interests, was motivated by personal concern.
In the absence of a separate self, there’s no personal motivation to do anything. Life just moves us.

When personal motivation no longer drives us, then what’s left is our true nature, which naturally expresses itself on the human dimension as love or compassion.
Not a compassion that we cultivate or practice because we’re supposed to, but a compassion that arises spontaneously from our undivided state. If we undertake being a good, compassionate person as a personal identity, it just gets in the way of awakening.”

As we continue on this path, the inner conflict and critical inner voice lessens, then disappears. We come to a place of inner knowing and compassion for ourselves and the world. This is the motivation that will drive us for the rest of our lives.

Namaste

35 thoughts on “Enlightenment and Inner Division

  1. It reminds me a little bit of French philosopher Sartre’s notion that if we are constantly trying to live up to some definition of ourselves (here, “compassionate person”) then we are never making free choices true to ourselves. That idea has always stuck with me, even as it differs here from Sartre in the belief that our human nature is by default compassionate (I agree). Thanks for sharing! 🙂

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  2. “In the absence of a separate self, there’s no personal motivation to do anything. Life just moves us.” ~> so, then, maybe my complete and utter lack of motivation and ambition is a good thing? 😀

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Very interesting! With this perspective it does seem to offer a benefit to cultivate motivation towards peace and compassion; kindness and loving acts. Maybe that would simplify the competition of the separate self? Much to think about here, Val! Thank you.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. I love this man. Always have. Because, hey, isn’t this just … it … ” When personal motivation no longer drives us, then what’s left is our true nature, which naturally expresses itself on the human dimension as love or compassion. Not a compassion that we cultivate or practice because we’re supposed to, but a compassion that arises spontaneously from our undivided state. If we undertake being a good, compassionate person as a personal identity, it just gets in the way of awakening.” Amen to that. ❤

    Liked by 3 people

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